Cyber Threat Modeling as a Service (TMaaS)

PASTA as a cyber threat modeling framework is adopted and used by worldwide organizations.

At VerSprite, we specialize in providing Threat Modeling as a Service (TMaaS), equipping businesses with comprehensive solutions to pinpoint and counteract potential security threats. Our proficiency in cybersecurity underscores the need for a proactive stance in protecting your organization’s critical assets.

Cyber Threat Modeling Service for Your Business

Threat Modeling as a Service yields a multitude of benefits, optimizing your testing budget and ensuring efficient use of your resources.

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Threat modeling is a crucial process in guaranteeing the security of software applications. By implementing threat modeling as a service, businesses can reap many benefits that enhance the overall security of their systems.

  1. Early detection of issues in the SDLC:

    Cyber threat modeling as a service empowers organizations to find potential security issues early in the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Incorporating threat modeling into the development process enables vulnerabilities to be detected and addressed before they escalate into costly and time-consuming problems.

  2. Uncovering design flaws:

    Through cyber threat modeling, businesses can discover design flaws that may leave their applications vulnerable to security breaches. By analyzing the system’s architecture and pinpointing potential weaknesses, organizations can make informed decisions to enhance the overall security posture of their software.

  3. Evaluating new forms of attack:

    As cyber threats evolve, it’s vital for businesses to stay ahead. Threat modeling as a service allows organizations to assess and evaluate new attack forms that may target their systems. By understanding potential attack vectors, businesses can proactively implement measures to protect their applications and data.

PASTA Threat Modeling eBook - Risk-Based Threat Modeling

The PASTA Threat Model eBook Risk-Based Threat Modeling

The Process for Attack Simulation and Threat Analysis (PASTA) provides businesses a strategic process for mitigating cybercrime risks by looking first and foremost at cyber threat mitigation as a business problem. The process provides the tactical steps that can be followed to provide effective countermeasures for mitigating existing vulnerabilities by analyzing the attacks that can exploit these vulnerabilities and mapping these attacks to threat scenarios that specifically focus on the application as a business-asset target.

At VerSprite, we provide comprehensive threat modeling as a service that is customized to the unique needs of your organization. Our team of seasoned security professionals collaborates with you to ensure your software applications are robust and secure. By capitalizing on our ability, you can mitigate risks, safeguard sensitive data, and maintain the trust of your customers.

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PASTA Threat Model Methodology
The 7 Stages of PASTA

(Process for Attack Simulation and Threat Analysis)

  1. Define Business Context of Application

    This considers the inherent application risk profile and address other business impact considerations early in the SDLC or for given Sprint under Scrum activities.

  2. Technology Enumeration

    You can’t protect what you don’t know is the philosophy behind this stage. It’s intended to decompose the technology stack that supports the application components that realize the business objectives identified from Stage 1.

  3. Application Decomposition

    Focuses on understanding the data flows amongst application components and services in the application threat model.

  4. Threat Analysis

    Reviews threat assertions from data within the environment as well as industry threat intelligence that is relevant to service, data, and deployment model.

  5. Weakness / Vulnerability Identification

    Identifies the vulnerabilities and weaknesses within the application design and code and correlates to see if it supports the threat assertions from the prior stage.

  6. Attack Simulation

    This stage focuses on emulating attacks that could exploit identified weaknesses/vulnerabilities from the prior stage. It helps to also determine the threat viability via attack patterns.

  7. Residual Risk Analysis

    This stage centers around remediating vulnerabilities or weaknesses in code or design that can facilitate threats and underlying attack patterns. It may warrant some risk acceptance by broader application owners or development managers.

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Key Characteristics of
PASTA Risk-Centric Threat Modeling

  1. It is a Methodology

    If you’re looking for a process to follow, PASTA is designed for that. With seven phases with underlying activities in each phase, this approach is intended to guide new and experienced threat modelers across risk-centric application threat modeling activities.

  2. Risk-Focused

    PASTA not only looks at the variables of threat, vulnerability, countermeasures, and impact. Most importantly, it considers the probability of each variable and other supporting qualities like threat motives, current threat evidence, and countermeasure effectiveness.

  3. Collaborative

    Most threat modeling exercises simply include an audience of developers. This is a limited approach since developers depend on design, underlying infrastructure, managed corporate services (e.g. SSO, IAM, PKI, etc.), and the configuration of open frameworks. For this reason, architects, DevOps team members, systems engineers, business analysts, and SOC team members are also good candidates for collaborative threat modeling discussions under PASTA.

  4. Prescriptive

    In the end, PASTA is focused on providing prescriptive guidance on the exploitable vulnerabilities that are of greater priority. The last phase, residual risk analysis, focuses on addressing security countermeasures to non-accepted application risks and providing remediation alternatives, all depending on the team’s risk impact considerations, threat likelihood, and cost of countermeasure implementation.

  5. Evidence-based

    Concrete evidence around quantitative business impact values, threat information driven threat assertions, and attack trees with probability values on each branch help to denote threat likelihood.

  6. Maturity Modeling Integration

    Whether you have never done threat modeling before or are a team of security champions, the activities defined within each phase of PASTA can correlate to both BSIMM and OpenSAMM maturity models for secure software development programs. Inquire more on how you can track maturity over time with PASTA and these maturity models.

  7. Pre-emptive Compliance

    PASTA considers technical requirements for applications as part of its first stage since non-compliance can affect product assurance towards varying regulatory requirements.

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Regulatory Compliance

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